Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Fire Dept. Weighs Plan for 37 Nighttime Closings

  1. #1
    Registered User SeaBreeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3,030

    Fire Dept. Weighs Plan for 37 Nighttime Closings

    Fire Dept. Weighs Plan for 37 Nighttime Closings

    By MICHAEL COOPER


    The New York City Fire Department is weighing a plan to close as many as 37 firehouses at night to help save money, city officials said yesterday.

    The plan to close firehouses at night was considered and then dropped last fall. But now, with Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg seeking another $600 million of budget cuts from city agencies

  2. #2
    Registered User SeaBreeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3,030

    FIREMEN RIP NIGHT CLOSURE PLAN

    FIREMEN RIP NIGHT CLOSURE PLAN

    By BRAD HUNTER

    March 29, 2003 -- Firefighters yesterday slammed the city's proposal to close 37 firehouses at night as "preposterous," foolish" and "insane."

    Unions representing New York's Bravest vowed to battle any attempt to close a single station and said the plan could kill civilians and firefighters alike.

    "People at City Hall have lost their minds," Uni-formed Firefighters Association president Steve Cassidy said.

    He said if there was another attack like 9/11, there would be "15 percent fewer firefighters to save people's lives. This proposal is preposterous."

    Peter Gorman, president of the Uniformed Fire Officers, said city bureaucrats have an outdated view of firehouses.

    "They think it's 1945 where the guys are all sitting around playing checkers," he said.



    http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/33126.htm

  3. #3
    Registered User SeaBreeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3,030

    Unions Criticize Plan to Close Up to 37 Firehouses at Night

    Unions Criticize Plan to Close Up to 37 Firehouses at Night
    By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD


    Unions representing firefighters and their officers yesterday invoked the memory of Sept. 11 heroics and the specter of buildings burning out of control as they criticized a Fire Department proposal to close dozens of firehouses at night.

    To cut costs for the financially struggling city, the department is considering a plan to close as many as 37 firehouses at night, when city officials say lighter street traffic would allow other fire companies to quickly take up the slack.

    The Fire Department is seeking $23.5 million in cuts as part of a City Hall contingency plan in case unions do not make $600 million in concessions that Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg has asked for.

    But the Uniformed Firefighters Association and the Uniformed Fire Officers Association, two of the department's unions, promised to fight any station closings and suggested that the city seek more federal money to balance its books. "Closing firehouses during the day or night is foolish," said Stephen Cassidy, president of the Uniformed Firefighters Association, which represents 8,200 firefighters. "Closing one firehouse is unacceptable. Closing 37 is insane."

    Although city officials have not disclosed which firehouses might be affected or what hours they would be closed, Mr. Cassidy disputed the city's predictions about about lighter traffic. The night shift, which runs from 6 p.m. to 9 a.m., includes the end of the evening rush and much of the morning rush, he said. He noted that large disasters had occurred during the shift, and pointed out that the first hijacked plane to strike the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, hit at 8:46 a.m.

    Even on ordinary days, Mr. Cassidy said, closing firehouses at night can have dire consequences. Most fatal fires occur at night, and nighttime fires are generally more dangerous than those in the day because, with people asleep, the fires typically burn longer before firefighters receive a call, he said.

    In fact, a firefighter was injured yesterday at an early-morning fire in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. Tom Butler, a spokesman for the Uniformed Firefighters Association, said the firefighter was being treated for burns after responding to the two-alarm fire at 1:30 a.m.

    Peter Gorman, president of the Uniformed Fire Officers Association, said city officials paid too much attention to financial ledgers and not enough to sacrifices firefighters made.

    Francis X. Gribbon, a spokesman for the Fire Department, declined to comment on the unions' statements beyond saying the proposal was one of many the department was considering to meet its fiscal goals.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2003/03/29/nyregion/29FIRE.html

  4. #4
    Registered User SeaBreeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3,030

    More Firehouses On The Block

    More Firehouses On The Block
    37 Stations May Close Nightly Under Proposed Plan

    By William Murphy
    Staff Writer

    March 28, 2003, 7:30 PM EST

    With eight firefighting companies still on the budget chopping block, the city is considering closing 37 firehouses at night.

    The proposed nighttime closures were confirmed Friday by Frank Gribbon, a Fire Department spokesman. He declined to discuss specifics or the likelihood of the closures.

    "The department is examining all its options to help close the city's budget gap," Gribbon said.

    After word of the latest proposal leaked Thursday night, the leaders of the city's fire unions scrambled a news conference Friday morning to lambaste it.

    In the wave of budget-cutting news, it was unclear how realistic the latest proposal may be. Given the work schedule of firefighters, such a nighttime closure probably would mean closing a firehouse between 6 p.m. and 9 a.m. That would cover the usual 15-hour shift that firefighters alternate with a 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. shift of nine hours.

    Stephen Cassidy, president of the Uniformed Firefighters Association, noted that the first alarm for the World Trade Center attack came at 8:45 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001.

    "Do you want people dialing 911 in an emergency and have dispatchers telling them that they have to wait 15 minutes for the firefighters to start work?" Cassidy asked.

    In the past, the city has bargained with employees for changes in work rules in return for job protection. One goal of several mayors has been to change the work schedule of firefighters, which allows them to swap tours and work two, 24-hour days every eight days.

    However, the motivation for unions to accept changes in work rules pretty much disappeared last week when Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the city's deficit makes layoffs likely, even if employees agree to his proposal to change work rules that the mayor says would save $600 million annually.


    http://www.nynewsday.com/news/local/...adlines%2Dleft

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •