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    Firefighter dies battling 4-alarm blaze

    Firefighter dies battling 4-alarm blaze

    The Associated Press

    NEW YORK

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    Blaze claims city bravest

    Blaze claims city bravest

    By KERRY BURKE, ALICE McQUILLAN and TRACY CONNOR
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

    A decorated firefighter who joined the Bravest after 9/11 was killed yesterday when a stack of flaming mattresses fell on him as he battled an inferno in an upper Manhattan warehouse.

    Trapped in the smoke and heat for 10 minutes, Thomas Brick, 30, was in cardiac arrest and badly burned by the time colleagues could pull him out, officials said. He became the second firefighter to die in the line of duty this year, and the second killed since the terror attacks.

    Brick left behind two young children and a shattered family who remembered how he loved to visit firehouses as a child and how proud he was to join one two years ago.

    "All he ever wanted to be was a firefighter," Mayor Bloomberg said. "His greatest dream was realized after 9/11, when he got the call saying he'd gotten a job with the greatest Fire Department in the world.

    "Sadly, he has paid that price that too many people have paid," Bloomberg added. "We are going to bed tonight missing one of our Bravest."

    The tragedy unfolded around 12:30 p.m., when a four-alarm blaze erupted in a mattress and furniture warehouse on the second floor of 3859 10th Ave., near W. 207th St., in Inwood.

    Brick's unit, Ladder Co. 36, was on the scene in four minutes, and even though the store was closed, they set up a search-and-rescue operation.

    "Firefighter Brick was right at the front fighting the fire," Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta said.

    One of the first six men inside the building, he was looking for anyone who might be trapped when the fire began spreading out of control, officials said.

    "The fire intensified [and] he was separated from his company," Bloomberg said.

    The thick smoke may have played a role in cutting off Brick from his comrades and stopped them from seeing him get knocked down.

    "Apparently, the mattresses collapsed," Scoppetta said. "He was hit in the collapse and when rescue came in they found him in cardiac arrest."

    His colleagues pulled Brick out of the building, put him on a stretcher and rushed him to Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. Doctors worked an hour to resuscitate Brick before declaring him dead.

    Three other firefighters suffered minor injuries in the fire, which raged for hours, sending flames roaring into the sky and forcing the evacuation of 61 people from a neighboring building.

    The cause was under investigation last night.

    Growing up in Flushing, Queens, Brick idolized the men of the FDNY and delighted in trips to Harlem with a family friend to clamber over the shiny red trucks at Engine Co. 69.

    After high school and two years at Nassau Community College, he worked for a funeral livery service, a resort and a hotel.

    But he never forgot his childhood dream.

    Brick was part of the first class to graduate from the Fire Academy after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

    "He was so proud," said his next-door neighbor in Flushing Bob Siaxabanis. "He loved being a firefighter."

    Friends recalled how Brick would come home after a shift sporting a big smile - along with an FDNY sweatshirt or baseball cap.

    At Ladder 36, he was considered a "spark plug," an energetic go-getter. He even earned a medal fighting his very first fire, helping to rescue two people from a Jan. 6, 2002, blaze.

    The only thing he seemed to love more than fighting fires was his two children - 4-year-old Madeline and 3-year-old Aden.

    Whenever Brick was home, neighbors would see the bachelor playing in the backyard with the kids. Last night, their thoughts were with the children, too young to understand their daddy's sacrifice.

    "He had two young children who will have to grow up without a father," Bloomberg said. "All we'll be able to tell them is that their father really was a hero."

    With Tamer El-Ghobashy and Derek Rose

    Originally published on December 17, 2003


    http://www.nydailynews.com/front/sto...p-129625c.html

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    Firefighter From Post-9/11 Class Dies in Warehouse Blaze

    Firefighter From Post-9/11 Class Dies in Warehouse Blaze

    By SHAILA K. DEWAN

    Published: December 17, 2003


    A rookie firefighter died yesterday while battling a fire at a second-floor warehouse in Upper Manhattan, becoming the first New York City firefighter to die by fire since Sept. 11, 2001.

    The firefighter, Thomas C. Brick, 30, was one of the first in his company to enter the mattress and furniture warehouse, officials said, and had gone farther into the building than other firefighters said they were able to get because of the ferocity of the four-alarm blaze.

    He was found under a pile of debris amid the flames, with a radio by his side but its emergency alert button unused, Fire Department officials said. Firefighter Brick was taken to Columbia-Presbyterian Center of New York Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 2 p.m.

    Three other firefighters had minor injuries, with one hospitalized for smoke inhalation and exhaustion, officials said.

    Firefighter Brick, the father of two children, had long dreamed of joining the Fire Department and seemed happiest in his department sweatshirt and cap, neighbors said. He was a member of the first academy class to be hired after the Sept. 11 terror attack at the World Trade Center.

    "He was part of a group of brave young men and women who are rebuilding the Fire Department after that tragic day of 9/11," Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said at the hospital.

    Yesterday's fire broke out about 12:30 p.m. A six-member team from Ladder 36 and Engine 95, battled the blaze in the smoke-filled warehouse at 3859 10th Avenue, between 206th and 207th Streets.

    Mr. Brick was the irons man, carrying the tools used for forcible entry and responsible for getting the team inside. "Firefighter Brick was right in the front fighting the fire," Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scopetta said at the news conference at the hospital.

    Department officials said they believed that Firefighter Brick was somehow separated from the company after its members climbed to the second floor, where visibility was poor because of the smoke. His body was found about 30 to 40 feet from the staircase the company had used, and he apparently had progressed farther than other firefighters, who said they were blocked by the smoke and intense heat.

    The team worked until they were nearly surrounded by flames, forcing them to withdraw, officials said. Usually, a company officer announces the withdrawal by hand signal or by a radio communication, but officials said they were still conducting interviews about what had happened in this case. When the other members of Ladder 36 were outside, they did a roll call and discovered Firefighter Brick was missing, officials said. They re-entered the building to search.

    When he was found by Rescue Company 3, officials said, he was burned and already in cardiac arrest, with debris and a fallen mattress on his body. He had a radio, officials said, but had not made a Mayday call or used his emergency button, leading investigators to theorize that he had been knocked unconscious. His oxygen mask had come off, officials said.

    Officials said the department was trying to determine when Firefighter Brick had last been seen

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    TRAGEDY ROCKS BRAVEST

    TRAGEDY ROCKS BRAVEST

    By JENNIFER FERMINO, PHILIP MESSING and IKIMULISA LIVINGSTON



    December 17, 2003 -- A city firefighter who joined the force a month after 9/11 died in a shower of flaming debris as he searched for victims inside a burning Manhattan building yesterday, officials said.

    Thomas Christopher Brick, 30, a father of two, suffered severe burns and went into cardiac arrest as he and 170 other firefighters battled the blaze at a two-story structure containing a mattress storehouse and grocery on 10th Avenue at 207th Street.

    The Flushing, Queens, firefighter is the first of the FDNY's post-9/11 class to die in the line of duty, authorities said.

    Officials said Brick went into the inferno with a group from his unit, Ladder 36, in an effort to find anyone trapped in the blaze, which started at about 12:30 p.m.

    Somehow, Brick got separated and disappeared in the thick smoke.

    After a 10-minute search for Brick, who did not activate his emergency locator, firefighters from Rescue 3 found him in a supermarket on the first floor under debris and a charred mattress that apparently had fallen through the ceiling.

    Brick was badly burned and suffering from cardiac arrest, officials said. He was taken to Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

    "Today is a very sad day for the New York City Fire Department," said Mayor Bloomberg, after meeting with Brick's family at the hospital.

    Bloomberg said Brick had dreamed of being a firefighter and he finally got his chance when the department put out a call for new recruits after Sept. 11.

    A former hotel worker and the son of a mortician, Brick has two children, a son, Aidyn, 2, and a daughter, Madeleine, 4.

    "He used to go to the local firehouse with a friend of the family and play on the engine," Bloomberg said.

    "His greatest dream was realized after 9/11 when he got that call that he'd gotten the job with the greatest fire department in the world."

    The fire, which gutted the upstairs mattress/furniture warehouse and an El Paraisio supermarket below, went to four alarms and took about 31/2 hours to bring under control.

    Four other firefighters were hospitalized with injuries.

    Fire officials said they do not yet know what sparked the blaze, which sent frightened grocery workers running for their lives.




    http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/13706.htm

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    HERO 'TOO' BRAVE

    HERO 'TOO' BRAVE

    By MURRAY WEISS and JOE McGURK



    December 18, 2003 -- Tragic firefighter Tom Brick's gung-ho enthusiasm for pulling victims from burning buildings apparently led to his death when the hero smoke-eater raced ahead of his crewmates and got separated from them, The Post has learned.

    Brick, who died in a shower of flaming debris at a mattress storehouse in upper Manhattan, "was very aggressive in trying to get to any possible victims and got a little ahead of his group," a source told The Post.

    "He was ahead perhaps as much as 20 to 30 feet. His fellow firefighters were unaware that he had forged ahead and they only discovered he was missing after they retreated."

    Brick's bravery was typical of his unwavering dedication to the city, said his friends and family, who yesterday poured into his parents' Flushing home throughout the day yesterday to pay their respects.

    "Even before he made it into the department he used to hang out with us. He always wanted to be in the department so bad," said Brick's longtime mentor, Jim Carney, who recently retired from Engine Co. 69.

    "This is the kind of young kid we want."

    A wake for Brick will be held today and Friday at the Harden Funeral Home, 208-17 Northern Blvd., in Bayside from 2-5 p.m. and 7-10 p.m.

    A funeral Mass will be held Saturday at 11 a.m. at St. Kevin's Roman Catholic Church, 45-50 195th St., in Flushing, followed by burial in St. Patrick's Cemetery in Huntington, L.I.

    Brick, the second firefighter to die on the job since the Sept. 11 terror attacks, went into cardiac arrest after being pinned under burning mattresses at 38-59 10th Ave. in Inwood on Tuesday.

    The two-year fireman is survived by his son Aidyn, 2, and daughter Madeleine, 4, the Fire Department said.

    "The family is devastated," his aunt Beth Pruser told The Post.

    "But the amount of support from the city and Mayor Bloomberg, down to the firefighters, is helping us. Everyone has been right here for us."

    Capt. Michael Everett at Ladder 36 added:

    "It's a tough loss. Tom was a great guy, very energetic. He loved the job. We loved him.

    "He was an inspiration to the firehouse. He was a hard worker, a dedicated firefighter. He knew his job. He worked really well with everybody here.

    "This was his dream. He made sure every moment he was here he was going to enjoy it."

    Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta said: "He was trained in fighting fires and committed into going into fires, to help rescue people and save property."

    Additional reporting by Ikimulisa Livingston, Dan Kadison and Larry Celona. Written by Bill Hoffmann


    http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/13804.htm


    ORPHANED: Firefighter Tom Brick, who was killed in a Tuesday inferno, leaves behind daughter Madeleine, 4, and son Aidyn, 2.

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    Did alarm fail fireman?

    Did alarm fail fireman?

    By ALICE McQUILLAN and TRACY CONNOR
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS


    The investigation into Firefighter Thomas Brick's death is focusing on an alarm in his oxygen mask and why no one heard it go off when he was felled by burning debris.

    Brick, 30, suffered a heart attack and burns after becoming separated from his unit while battling a four-alarm blaze at an upper Manhattan mattress warehouse Tuesday afternoon.

    Firefighters' masks have a personal alert safety system, known as PASS, that "chirps" loudly if the firefighter stops moving.

    Brick was left behind when other members of Ladder Co. 36 retreated from the inferno.

    Outside, a roll call revealed that the two-year veteran was missing, and Rescue 3 plunged in to find him.

    When he was found, his PASS alarm was chirping "very faintly," a fire official said.

    Investigators want to know if the device malfunctioned or was simply muffled by water and the burning mattress that collapsed and knocked Brick unconscious.

    Officials said it appears all the firefighters who responded to the blaze at 10th Ave. and 207th St. followed proper procedures. The cause of the fire was under investigation.

    Brick, who was in the first Fire Academy class called up after the 9/11 terror attacks, was the second firefighter to die in the line of duty this year.

    At Ladder 36 in Inwood, which had not lost a member in a generation, his comrades posted his photo on the blackboard.

    "Tommy, God willing, our hearts will be as big as yours someday," someone wrote in chalk. Brick's trademark grin beamed out from the picture.

    "No matter what you did to him, you couldn't wipe the smile off his face," said Lt. Douglas Feffer, 41, referring to the ribbing the rookie took.

    "The more you gave him a hard time, the bigger it got."

    Firefighters joked about how they nicknamed the young man "Brick House" and would sing the Commodores' song to him.

    Mostly, though, they remembered his enthusiasm for the job.

    "You knew when Tom was in the firehouse because the energy level would just rise," Capt. Michael Everette said.

    "He was living his dream," said Firefighter Michael Wunder, 38, a mentor to Brick.

    When Mayor Bloomberg stopped by the Vermilyea Ave. firehouse around noon and spotted the photo of Brick, he was moved to kiss his hand and touch it to the frame.

    Then he saw another picture - of him standing with Brick and his colleagues last spring on Medal Day, when he was honored for helping to save two people his first day of work.

    "It's a dangerous job, and we are lucky you guys are there to do it," the mayor said. "Once in a while the odds catch up with someone, and they pay for the rest of us."

    At Brick's home in Flushing, Queens, his passion for firefighting was the only consolation to his close-knit family.

    His parents, a funeral director and a nurse, were planning a wake for their eldest son today and tomorrow.

    A funeral Mass will be said Saturday at St. Kevin's Church, where Brick was an altar boy and choir bell ringer in his youth.

    "Right now, I'm just thinking about his spirit for everything - the Fire Department, Christmas, his children, my children," his sister Megan Assimacopoulos, 27, said. "We're going to miss him."

    It seemed as though everyone who stopped by the Brick home had a story about how much Tommy loved the FDNY.

    His aunt, Beth Pruser, told how proud he was to march in the St. Patrick's Day Parade, carrying a flag to honor one of the 343 firefighters and EMTs killed on 9/11.

    Friend Jim Carney, a retired firefighter, remembered how a teenage Brick would visit him at Engine 69 in Harlem. "He was a young kid that wanted to be on the job so bad," Carney said.

    Even those who didn't know him were touched. In Inwood, neighbors placed votive candles and flowers on an unspooled hose outside Ladder 36.

    Raymond Rodriguez, 38, left a spray of white carnations below black and purple bunting.

    "Those are the New York soldiers," he said.


    With Ralph R. Ortega, Austin Fenner and David Saltonstall


    Originally published on December 18, 2003


    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/stor...p-129816c.html

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    Retracing the Last Fatal Steps in a Young Firefighter's Life

    Retracing the Last Fatal Steps in a Young Firefighter's Life

    By SHAILA K. DEWAN and MICHELLE O'DONNELL

    Published: December 18, 2003


    About 15 minutes after firefighters started battling the blaze, the smoke closed in, wiping the screen of the world blank and leaving only darkness and heat.

    Members of the "inside team" of Ladder Company 36, a lieutenant and two junior firefighters, had to get out of the burning building in upper Manhattan. They retreated, groping, through the second floor, stumbling to a stairwell filled with a crush of other escaping firefighters.

    There, the lieutenant did a quick check, peering at the two masked firefighters who had followed him out. "Brick?" he asked one, believing the man to be 30-year-old Firefighter Thomas C. Brick.

    "He said, `Brick? Are you Brick?' Somebody said, `Yeah, I'm Brick,' but he still had his mask on," a fire official familiar with the conversation said yesterday.

    It was a case of mistaken identity in the blanketing smoke and suffocating heat, caused by the confusion of either the man who asked the question or the man who answered it. It was not Firefighter Brick, a man on the job for just over two years. It was a firefighter from another unit, several fire officials said yesterday.

    Firefighter Brick, the father of young children, was still trapped inside.

    When the error was discovered, it was too late. A special rescue unit found him unconscious on the floor, his air mask off, his face black. He was taken to Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center but soon became the first firefighter to die fighting a blaze since Sept. 11, 2001.

    The events of Tuesday afternoon in a burning two-story building on 10th Avenue in Inwood were a reminder that the smallest misstep can have far-reaching and deadly consequences. In some cases, a hose a fraction of an inch too small or a kink in a line have led to firefighters' deaths. In this case, the cause may have been a case of mistaken identity that hinged on a nod of the head.

    Yesterday, as the Fire Department began a standard inquiry into the death, questions were being raised, some of which focused on how the order to pull out of the building was relayed, and on the lieutenant's accounting of his men. Firefighter Brick's equipment was also being checked for faults. Some veterans asked whether inexperience contributed to the death.

    Firefighter Brick was one of the many newcomers who have flooded the department since Sept. 11. The lieutenant, whose name was not released, has been with the department for eight years but became an officer only a year ago.

    An officer can order firefighters out of a building in various ways, a department official said yesterday, including a pat on the back, a verbal order, or a radio call. While there is no strict procedure, the official said, he acknowledged that the group should stick close together. Department veterans said commanders usually keep their teams close enough to be in voice contact.

    Firefighter Brick, though, was separated from the rest of the group by a cloud of dense smoke, Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta said yesterday. He did not radio a mayday, or press an emergency call button on his radio. Although he was badly burned, the medical examiner said yesterday that he had died of smoke inhalation.

    After it was learned that the man the lieutenant thought was Firefighter Brick was actually someone else, the roll was called at the scene, officials said. It was unclear whether the rescue unit was dispatched before the roll call was completed, or whether precious minutes passed, officials said. The rescue team found the body 10 minutes after entering the building.

    The sequence of events is crucial to the department's inquiry into what went wrong.

    Typically, a ladder officer

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    After Fatal Fire, Questions Burn

    After Fatal Fire, Questions Burn
    Clues sought in firefighter's death

    By William Murphy and Daryl Khan
    STAFF WRITERS

    December 18, 2003


    The blaze that cost a young firefighter his life Tuesday was still under investigation yesterday and there appeared to be no clear explanation of why he died, officials said.

    Accounts pieced together from union and department sources suggested that it was a typical case of an aggressive attack on a blaze by firefighters who didn't know whether victims were trapped inside.

    Firefighter Thomas C. Brick, 30, got separated from his colleagues of Ladder Company 36 while in a mattress and furniture storage facility in upper Manhattan.

    The ladder company got to the scene first, just seconds ahead of the first engine company, which pumps water onto fires, the department said.

    Without a hose line in place to protect them, the members of the ladder company entered the two-story building and worked their way up a side stairway to the second floor, the officials said.

    When the thick smoke and heat from the flames became too intense, a superior officer ordered the firefighters out.

    When the members of Ladder Company 36 got back to the ground floor, the lieutenant did a quick head count - a procedure that is automatic when leaving a fire - and found he was missing a firefighter.

    The lieutenant, a 17-year veteran, immediately issued a "Mayday" distress call and his company and other rescuers went back through the smoke and flames on the second floor.

    Members of Rescue 3 and Ladder 36 found Brick 10 minutes later under a pile of mattresses, burned and in cardiac arrest. He was declared dead at 2 p.m. at New York-Presbyterian Hospital's Columbia Presbyterian Center.

    Some firefighters said the second-floor storage area was used to refurbish used mattresses that contractors buy off the street and then plump up, sewing on a new outer lining.

    The city's Department of Consumer Affairs said it was aware of such scams, but that the department had gotten only 10 complaints about used mattresses during the past year, and none was about the fire scene.

    Chief Fire Marshal Louis Garcia said the cause of the fire was still being investigated.

    The department canceled its holiday party, scheduled for yesterday, due to the tragedy.

    Copyright

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    A Swift Climb, Then Gone Too Soon

    A Swift Climb, Then Gone Too Soon

    By William Murphy and Daryl Khan
    STAFF WRITERS

    December 18, 2003


    On his first tour of duty, firefighter Thomas C. Brick helped save six people trapped in a blazing apartment house, and his unit got a citation for valor.

    On Tuesday, less than two years later, the unit rushed into a burning building in upper Manhattan. There was no dramatic rescue this time, and Brick came out on a stretcher, burned and in cardiac arrest. He died in the hospital at 2 p.m.

    "His specialty was doing whatever we needed him to do," Capt. Michael Everett said outside Ladder 36 in Inwood yesterday. "When we went out to a fire we would all work hard, but he seemed to enjoy it tremendously."

    Brick apparently got so far into the smoke and fire on Tuesday that he could not retreat when the company officer ordered the unit out because of the intensity of the blaze.

    In both fires, Ladder Company 36 was the first unit on the scene, although a water-pumping engine company normally gets to a fire first.

    Brick was a probationary or "probie" firefighter on Jan. 6, 2002, carrying a heavy metal fire extinguisher that made him the "can man."

    Tuesday, his job was handling "the irons," the heavy metal tools that ladder companies use to force doorways open and gouge roofs open to vent the fire.

    It would have been unthinkable 10 years ago for a firefighter to go so quickly from "can man" to working "the irons" and being a key part of the rescue team, according to several firefighters.

    The loss of 343 firefighters on Sept. 11, 2001, and a wave of retirements afterward left firefighters like Brick, 30, as very young veterans.

    While acknowledging the relative youth of Brick's company, both the Fire Department and union officials have said there were no breakdowns in communication or procedure during Tuesday's fire, and noted that the lieutenant in charge had 17 years' experience.

    Brick, a Flushing resident with two young children, was sworn in as a firefighter on Oct. 28, 2001. He was assigned to Ladder 36 when he finished training in January, 2002, and was in a serious fire before his first shift ended.

    A few months later, his unit was awarded the Thomas R. Elsasser Memorial Medal for valor for rescuing six people from that fire, at an apartment house on West 187th Street.

    A wake is scheduled for today and tomorrow, 2 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. both days, at the Harden Funeral Home, 208-17 Northern Blvd. in Bayside. The funeral will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at St. Kevin's Roman Catholic Church at 194th Street and 45th Avenue.

    The Brick family asked that in lieu of flowers, donations be made through the Uniformed Firefighters Association to the Thomas Elsasser Scholarship Fund, established to aid the families of firefighters who die while off duty. Checks can be mailed to the fund in care of the union, 204 E. 23rd St., New York, NY 10010.

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    Comrades, Kin Crowd FDNY Wake

    COMRADES, KIN CROWD FDNY WAKE

    By IKIMULISA LIVINGSTON


    December 19, 2003 -- Hundreds of firefighters packed a Queens funeral home yesterday for an emotional wake for fallen comrade Thomas Brick, who died Tuesday fighting a blaze in a mattress storehouse in Inwood.

    Patiently, they filed in to pay their respects, kneeling before the open casket. Many walked away with tears in their eyes.

    Brick, 30, was dressed in the department's formal blues and lay in a mahogany casket, as two firefighters stood at attention as an honor guard.

    "We're going to miss him for all the fun he brought to the firehouse," said Firefighter Michael Wunder, who worked with Brick at Ladder 36.

    Funeral services will be held tomorrow at St. Kevin's Roman Catholic Church at 11 a.m.



    http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/13958.htm

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    Tears for the firefighter with the beaming smile

    Tears for the firefighter with the beaming smile

    By KERRY BURKE and DAVE GOLDINER
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

    Fire officials are investigating whether firefighter Thomas Brick's oxygen mask was working properly when he was felled by smoke and flames inside an Inwood mattress factory inferno, sources said yesterday.

    As hundreds lined up to mourn the hero firefighter at a wake, officials questioned whether Brick ripped the mask off because he wasn't getting air or whether blazing mattresses knocked it off him.

    "Why was it off his face?" a source asked. "We want to make sure it was working."

    The new disclosure came as an overflow crowd of friends and firefighters waited in the cold to pay respects to Brick's family at a Bayside, Queens, funeral home.

    Capt. Michael Everett said Ladder 36 was struggling to cope with its loss. "We miss Tommy," he said. "There are moments when we break down."

    Brick, 30, a two-year veteran who joined the Fire Department after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, suffered a heart attack and burns after being separated from his unit inside the factory Tuesday.

    Fire marshals are still trying to pinpoint the cause of the blaze and are investigating why firefighters didn't realize Brick was missing until they gathered for a roll call outside.

    At the wake, bouquets of flowers surrounded the open coffin. His parents, Thomas and Margaret; brother Chris, and sister Megan sat choking back tears at Harden Funeral Home.

    A funeral Mass for the devoted dad will be said at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. Kevin's Church on 194th St. in Auburndale, Queens.

    Margaret Brick had told family friend Jim Carney that being a firefighter tamed her son's wild side and helped him to live out his dreams.

    "This job saved his life," she said, according to Carney.


    With Alice McQuillan


    Originally published on December 19, 2003

    http://www.nydailynews.com/front/sto...p-130053c.html

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    Fallen Queens Firefighter Waked

    Fallen Queens Firefighter Waked

    By Wil Cruz and Luis Perez
    Staff Writers

    December 18, 2003, 8:27 PM EST


    Firefighters packed a Bayside funeral home Thursday to pay their respects to a fallen comrade, Thomas C. Brick, fatally injured battling a mattress and furniture warehouse fire Tuesday.

    Some glumly puffed on cigarettes outside the funeral home, others huddled in small groups and still others offered the familiar bear hug mark of their closeness.

    Capt. Michael Everett, the commanding officer of Brick's unit, Ladder Co. 36, emerged from the services briefly and described the deep feelings of loss and hurt.

    "He was a brother. They're upset. They're mourning. It's tough," Everett said. "Tommy was a great kid. We're going to miss him dearly."

    The Fire Department said last night it still had not established the cause or origin of the four-alarm blaze in the Inwood section of Manhattan.

    Brick, 30, of Flushing, the father of two young children, was the second firefighter in the city to die in the line of duty since Sept. 11, 2001.

    "Emotions range up and down," Everett said outside Harden Funeral Home on Northern Boulevard. "We break down when we see a picture of him

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    Brick, Thomas Christopher

    Age: 30
    Cause of Death: Caught or Trapped
    Rank: Firefighter
    Nature of Death:
    Status: Career
    Emergency Duty: Yes
    Incident Date: 12/16/2003
    Duty Type: Fireground Operations
    Incident Time: 12:30
    Activity Type: Search and Rescue
    Death Date: 12/16/2003
    Fixed Prop. Use: Storage

    Fire Dept. Info:
    FDNY (Ladder Company 36)
    9 Metro Tech
    Brooklyn , New York 11201
    Chief: Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta

    Initial Summary:
    Died while conducting search and rescue operations at a 4 alarm blaze in a furniture/mattress storage warehouse.

    Memorial Fund Info:
    Pending


    http://www.usfa.fema.gov/application....cfm?p_id=1484

  15. #15
    Registered User SeaBreeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3,030
    FUNERAL TODAY FOR FDNY HERO

    December 20, 2003 -- The funeral for firefighter Thomas Brick, 30, of Ladder Co. 36 in Manhattan, who was killed in the line of duty, will be held today at St. Kevin's Roman Catholic Church, 45-21 194th St. in Flushing at 11 a.m.

    Burial is at St. Patrick's Cemetery in Huntington, Long Island.

    Brick died Tuesday from injuries while battling a four-alarm blaze in a furniture and mattress warehouse in Inwood.



    http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/44135.htm

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