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Thread: Fallen Heroes Memorial Pony Donated to Hall of Flame

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    Administrator Neil's Avatar
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    Thumbs up������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Fallen Heroes Memorial Pony Donated to Hall of Flame

    Fallen Heroes Memorial Pony Donated to Hall of Flame

    In the days following the national tragedy of September 11, 2001, as people struggled for an adequate expression of their feelings, we at The Trail of Painted Ponies wondered how we could memorialize the victims of the terrorist attacks. The result was a collaboration between artists, artisans, and friends who believed in the healing power of art.

    LD Burke, a graphic designer known for his cowboy furniture, came up with the basic idea. He recalled the riderless horse that led President John F Kennedy's funeral procession - tacked up with a cavalry officer's saddle with a pair of empty, high-top boots fitted in the stirrups backwards - and was familiar with the meaning behind the tradition. He knew it symbolized that a hero had fallen and would ride no more. LD thought there could be no more deserving example in modern times of bravery and heroic conduct than the firemen and policemen who rushed to their deaths at the World Trade Center, responding to the call for help from others victimized by the worst terrorist attack in American history.


    In the days following the national tragedy of September 11, 2001, as people struggled for an adequate expression of their feelings, we at The Trail of Painted Ponies wondered how we could memorialize the victims of the terrorist attacks. The result was a collaboration between artists, artisans, and friends who believed in the healing power of art.

    LD Burke, a graphic designer known for his cowboy furniture, came up with the basic idea. He recalled the riderless horse that led President John F Kennedy's funeral procession - tacked up with a cavalry officer's saddle with a pair of empty, high-top boots fitted in the stirrups backwards - and was familiar with the meaning behind the tradition. He knew it symbolized that a hero had fallen and would ride no more. LD thought there could be no more deserving example in modern times of bravery and heroic conduct than the firemen and policemen who rushed to their deaths at the World Trade Center, responding to the call for help from others victimized by the worst terrorist attack in American history.
    http://www.hallofflame.org/
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    Administrator Neil's Avatar
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    Thumbs up������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Trail of Painted Ponies

    The Trail of Painted Ponies provided Mena's Coach Works in Santa Fe, New Mexico with a Pony that was painted with a special "harlequin" paint that, depending on the light, changes in color from fire-engine to flame-yellow. It is outfitted with a 1928 McClellan saddle refurbished exclusively for this Pony by the San Angelo, Texas saddle maker, Shawn Pascuzzi. Finally, a special base was built by silversmith Bruce Hayles that houses the official hats, set against a stars-and-stripes background, of three services who lost members: FDNY, NYPD and Port Authority.

    After an unveiling in Santa Fe, the Fallen Heroes Memorial Pony traveled to La Guardia Airport in New York City where it was put on display in the Central Terminal Building. There it stood as a tribute to, in the words of New York fire chief John McCormack, "a day when 25,000 lives were saved in the World Trade Center because the members of the fire department, police department, and Port Authority did what they do best."

    The Fallen Heroes Memorial Pony is being donated by Rod Barker, the President and Executive Director of The Trail of Painted Ponies, to the Hall of Flame, the world's largest museum dedicated to firefighting. Located in Phoenix, Arizona, the Hall of Flame is creating a special exhibit for this moving memorial which will take its place among many fascinating examples and artifacts of the colorful history of firefighting. Click here for more information on the Hall of Flame
    http://www.trailofpaintedponies.com/fallenheros.html
    http://www.hallofflame.org/

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    Children's 9/11 prayers highlighted at ceremony

    Children's 9/11 prayers highlighted at ceremony


    Lesley Wright
    The Arizona Republic
    Sept. 13, 2004 12:00 AM


    SCOTTSDALE - Allison Collins was 6 years old when terrorists struck the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, but she knew about death.

    Her grandfather had just died, and Allison's mother had talked to her quite a bit about heaven. So Allison knew just what to write when her class crafted memorial prayers: "Dear America, God loves us. Don't worry about your families in heaven. They are safe with my grandpa and God."

    That prayer and dozens of others were compiled in the best-selling Children's Prayers for America. And Allison, who is from Scottsdale, joined about a dozen co- authors for a book signing this weekend in Scottsdale Fashion Square.

    The children recalled that the day was "sad" and "horrible," a sentiment shared by dozens of visitors who lined up to buy the book and a companion "Painted Pony" figurine.

    The two-day memorial event drew teary-eyed firefighters from Phoenix and New York, who milled around a life-sized resin horse that will be displayed in Phoenix's Hall of Flame Museum of Firefighting.

    Standing on a coffinlike display box, the riderless "Fallen Heroes Memorial Pony" changes colors with the light. A vintage saddle is embossed with September 11, 2001, and a pair of firefighter's boots stands backward in the stirrups.



    The department-store din did not bother retired New York Firefighter Dick Stuve.

    "We're catching the core of America here," he said.

    While firefighters still cope with anger as well as grief, 9-year-old Prayers author Abby Walker of Scottsdale said she remembers being sad.

    "I think it's just amazing that it happened and just that you should be nice to everybody," she said, pointing out her drawing of a sun and her letter that said, "You can borrow my guardian angel."

    New York Firefighter Bill Canner recalled similar letters that poured into New York in the days following Sept. 11. He was working at ground zero, and his family didn't know at first whether he had survived.

    "As the weeks went by, we started receiving tons of mail from children all around the country," said Canner, who retired last year. "Getting this mail really helped the men. We thought it was just a New York thing."

    His daughter Courtney, now 13, has a deeply personal memory of 9/11. "Everything on TV," she said. "And not knowing where my Dad was."

    http://www.azcentral.com/news/articl...hildren13.html

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